Atlantic Employers’ Counsel – Summer 2015

THE EDITORS’ CORNER

Michelle Black and Sean Kelly

Aaah, summer – that long anticipated stretch of lazy, lingering days, free of responsibility and rife with possibility. It’s a time to hunt for insects, master handstands, practice swimming strokes, conquer trees, explore nooks and crannies, and make new friends.

– Darrell Hammond

Of course, all these exciting activities should be pursued during non-work hours. But is that always what happens?

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SICKNESS, SICKNESS EVERYWHERE, NOR ANY CURE IN SIGHT

Peter McLellan, QC and Michael MacIsaac

Benjamin Franklin once said that a person should “be not sick too late, nor well too soon.” However, what happens when an employee is sick too soon and well… well, never?

That was precisely the question an arbitrator in British Columbia was forced to confront in Loblaws Cos. and UFCW, Local 247 (P.J.)), Re, [2014] B.C.W.L.D. 2088. A unionized employee was terminated for non-culpable absenteeism after she missed between 10 per cent and 17 per cent of her work days over a roughly three year period, beginning in 2010.

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10 TIPS TO HAVING AN ATTENDANCE MANAGEMENT PLAN THAT WORKS

Harold Smith, QC

1. Commitment to attendance management as an organizational tool

Even the best attendance management plans, drafted with great care and attention to the most up-to-date principles, often fail. They fail because there is essentially no commitment to them by senior and middle management. Before the development of an Attendance Management Plan (“AMP”), the work begins with the internal management meeting where the managers are briefed on the costs to the organization of the excessive absenteeism rates.

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NEW TERRITORY IN HUMAN RIGHTS – WHEN SHOULD YOU ACCOMMODATE AN EMPLOYEE’S CHOICE TO BREASTFEED?

Patti Wheatley

An employer’s “duty to accommodate” is a continually evolving – and sometimes confusing – area of the law. While accommodating employees with a disability is typically familiar territory for many employers, the legal obligation regarding accommodating on the basis of “family status” is still emerging. It is simple enough to state that an employer may not discriminate on the basis of family status, but what that means is far from settled.

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MANAGING CHRONIC ILLNESS IN THE WORKPLACE – CONSIDERATIONS AND STRATEGIES

Lisa Gallivan and Sean Kelly

Employers who deal with management of medical conditions and/or disabilities in the workplace know that each issue must be dealt with individually with particular attention to the specific facts and circumstances of the case. Managing chronic illness (i.e., those that are persistent, recurring and long-lasting) at work can be particularly challenging for employers due to the nature of the condition, changes in symptoms and the degree or frequency of recurrence.

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The New Brunswick Labour and Employment Board affirms longstanding practice against piecemeal certification of bargaining units

July 8, 2019

Bryan Mills and John Morse On May 21, 2019, the New Brunswick Labour and Employment Board (”Board”) dismissed an application by the New Brunswick Union of Public and Private Employees (“Union”) seeking certification as bargaining…

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Carbon pricing: Ontario Court of Appeal delivers constitutional endorsement

July 5, 2019

Jonathan Coady and Justin Milne The Ontario Court of Appeal has found that the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act¹ is valid federal legislation.² The Act implements national minimum pricing standards to reduce greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions.…

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A Charter right to testamentary freedom? The NSSC decision in Lawen Estate

July 2, 2019

Richard Niedermayer, TEP, Jennifer Taylor and Bhreagh Ross, summer student There is a right to testamentary freedom under section 7 of the Charter, according to a recent decision of the Nova Scotia Supreme Court. In…

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Hydro-Quebec now subject to annual energy cap, but not a monthly cap, under much-disputed 1969 power contract: Churchill Falls (Labrador) Corp. v Hydro-Quebec, 2019 QCCA 1072

June 24, 2019

John Samms Introduction Much ink has been spilled on the controversial 1969 power contract between Hydro-Quebec and CFLCo (the contract) and last week the Quebec Court of Appeal added to the pile with its decision…

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Final cannabis edibles, topicals and extracts regulations released

June 17, 2019

Kevin Landry On June 14, 2019, Health Canada announced the release of the final version of amendments to the Cannabis Regulations, which will permit for the production and sale of edibles, extracts and topicals. The…

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Trademark changes

June 17, 2019

Daniela Bassan and Divya Subramanian The Canadian Trade-marks Act will be amended effective June 17, 2019. As a result, the Act will undergo a complete overhaul on various aspects of trademark prosecution, registration, and enforcement.…

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Discovery: Atlantic Education & the Law – issue 04

June 12, 2019

We are pleased to present the fourth issue of Discovery, our very own legal publication targeted to educational institutions in Atlantic Canada. While springtime for universities and colleges signal the culmination of classes, new graduates…

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How employers can protect themselves with respect to social media

May 29, 2019

Grant Machum and Richard Jordan   In an earlier article, we considered an employer’s options when an employee departs and takes with them the social media contacts they have obtained during the course of their…

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Canada’s Digital Charter – a principled foundation for a digital future?

May 28, 2019

Matthew Jacobs and Daniel Roth (summer student)   “… we cannot be a Blockbuster government serving a Netflix society.” – The Hon. Minister Navdeep Bains paraphrasing the Hon. Scott Brison (May 2019, at the Empire…

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New reporting requirements for beneficial ownership of federal corporations coming this June

May 24, 2019

Tauna Staniland, Andrea Shakespeare, Kimberly Bungay and Alycia Novacefski The federal government has introduced new record keeping requirements for private, federally formed corporations governed by the Canada Business Corporations Act (“CBCA”). The amendments to the…

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